This week sees the release of Tom Davis's book "39 Years of Short-Term Memory Loss: The Early Days of SNL From Someone Who Was There." The trip down memory lane by Al Franken's former writing partner has put the old days of NBC's sketch-comedy monolith at the top of our minds. So many gifted performers have graced the stages of Studio 8H over the years, it's hard to keep track of them all.

Sure, Eddie Murphy and Will Ferrell are inescapable these days, but whatever happened to Victoria Jackson and Tim Kazurinsky? And how about the actors and comedians you forgot were ever even on the show, like Sarah Silverman and that guy who played Iron Man? Take a trip through the yester-years of "SNL" with our gallery of lesser-known "Not-Ready-for-Prime-Time Players" and featured cast members from the '80s and '90s. Then tell us (in your best Don Pardo voice) whom we missed in the comments.

Odd SNL Cast Members

    Joe Piscopo (1980-1985)
    Then: Along with Eddie Murphy, Piscopo pretty much saved "SNL" in the years following the departure of big guns Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray. Characters like "Doug Whiner" and Piscopo's famous Frank Sinatra impression (which got the comedian dubbed "Vice-Chairman of the Board" by Ol' Blue Eyes himself) helped to define late-night comedy during the '80s.

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    Now: Despite starring in films like "Johnny Dangerously" and "Wise Guys," Piscopo failed to achieve Eddie Murphy-levels of fame. But he's still a reliable fixture on TV ("Law & Order"), Broadway ("Grease") and stand-up comedy circuits. And could a New Jersey Senate run be in Piscopo's future? Hey, if Stuart Smalley can do it ...

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    Robert Downey Jr. (1985-1986)
    Then: Prior to his short stint on "SNL," the young actor (then known only as Robert Downey) was an up-and-comer with roles in his father's films ("Pound," "Up the Academy") and "Weird Science."

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    Now: After leaving "SNL" Downey went on to become one of the most acclaimed (and troubled) actors of his generation. 2008 marked a career-high point for the actor, with roles in "Iron Man" and "Tropic Thunder," the latter a return to the broad comedy of his "SNL" days.

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    Melanie Hutsell (1991-1994)
    Then: Famous for adding "Marsha! Marsha! Marsha!" to the popular lexicon with her Jan Brady character (a role she played onstage in "The Real Live Brady Bunch"), Hutsell managed to get noticed despite being surrounded by the likes of Phil Hartman and Mike Myers. Her impressions of everyone from Tonya Harding to Tori Spelling helped solidify Hutsell as a permanent fixture of the '90s.

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    Now: Hutsell mostly retired from show business after "SNL" to raise her children, but still occasionally turns up in bit parts in films and TV.

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    Nora Dunn (1985-1990)
    Then: Best remembered (along with Jan Hooks) as one-half of the singing Sweeney sisters, Dunn stood out among the late-'80s-SNL boy club with her distinctive characters and spot-on impressions. She also famously refused to appear in the episode hosted by Andrew "Dice" Clay, claiming his raunchy act was offensive to women.

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    Now: Still a reliable character performer, Dunn turns up in films ("Zoolander," "Pineapple Express") and on TV ("Entourage"). She addressed the "Dice" Clay controversy in the "Live From New York" book, saying her refusal to do the show wasn't a publicity stunt. As for the "Dice Man," he claims to have not known who Dunn was.

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    Randy Quaid (1985-1986)
    Then: Quaid joined the cast for the notorious '85-'86 season as part of Lorne Michaels' plan to stock the show with established talent after losing stars Martin Short and Billy Crystal. He was promptly canned a season later along with every other cast member save Nora Dunn, Dennis Miller and Jon Lovitz.

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    Now: Post-"SNL," Quaid went back to films, starring in everything from "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" to "Brokeback Mountain." Recently Quaid's courted controversy, suing the "Brokeback" producers and getting tossed out of Actor's Equity for allegedly abusing his fellow cast members in the musical "Lone Star Love."

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