Space tourism is all the rage among billionaires these days, but a new €3-billion business venture aims to vault garbagemen, insurance adjusters and even lowly writers into space at a reasonable rate. This investment isn't for rockets, however -- it's for Club Med: In Space.

"Tourists come to the hotel with all the necessary items to stay, as if they were staying at the most extreme refuge on earth," says Xavier Claramunt, who knows something about extreme travel. He's the founder/president of the Galactic Suite Space Resort, the world's first space hotel, set to open in 2012, where you and all your friends can hang out for a weekend at the recession-busting price of €1 million per night. For that amount of chump change, you'll see the sun rise 15 times a day, making all-nighters a cinch, and you'll do laps around the Earth every few hours, all while covered in the velcro needed to keep you from floating around your room like a schmuck.

You're probably thinking that this is out of your league since you lost all of that dot-com money. No worries, Mr. Bloomberg, the prices are bound to plummet from the stratosphere within fifteen years or so, according to Claramunt. Then again, that four mil doesn't cover the cost of the trip to space, an endeavor carried out by rocketship from an airstrip in the Caribbean, also to be built by Galactic Suite.

Between the launch pads, rocketships, and hotels roaming around our outer limits, you can't be blamed for wondering how this thing is going to be ready in three years. Reuters claims that critics have called the timetable unrealistic, but these are probably the same critics who thought Star Wars was going to bomb. Brett Snyder, a.k.a. the Cranky Flier, agrees: "My guess is that this isn't going to happen by 2012 unless they can find someone with incredibly deep pockets who enjoys throwing money away. This just sounds way too ambitious. But do I think we'll get there eventually? Sure. I just don't have faith that it will happen anytime soon.

"Even if it does," he adds, "It will take ages for it to be affordable by anyone other than the rich and famous."

All we want to know is if the company is looking for journalists to check-in in order to file a big story for, say, Asylum.com.