We've finally calmed down after learning that the E-Trade babies -- those sassy talking tots who understand the global stock market for no apparent reason -- could be starring in their own movie. And no longer brimming with furious anger, we thought we'd help remake-happy Hollywood's current creative bankruptcy. It's only a matter of time before they give up and just start pumping out feature-length advertisements.

Here's where they got it wrong: Instead of forcing a "Look Who's Talking" rip-off down our collective throats, Tinseltown should have looked to other (i.e., better) advertising mascots for inspiration.


Here are seven movies based on famous commercials that we'd actually like to see.

(All posters below designed by Brendan McGinley)

"The Noid"
The beloved Domino's Pizza mascot comes to the big screen at last!

When the nation's pizzas are threatened by nefarious super-prankster The Noid (played by Tracy Morgan), it's up to one diligent Domino's employee (Jesse Eisenberg) and his impossibly hot girlfriend (Olivia Wilde) to stop the costumed imp before it's too late.

It's the movie that guarantees at least 30 minutes of laughs ... or your ticket is free!

"National Treasure: Where's the Beef?"
It's a race around the world as Nicolas Cage helps former Wendy's spokeswoman Clara Peller (deliciously brought back to life by the special effects wizards behind "Avatar") finally uncover the location of the beef.

Will they find a patty large enough to satisfy Peller's ravenous hunger before it's too late? And what secrets lie in Ronald Reagan's tomb?

Co-starring Rich Little as the voice of robot Reagan!

"Exorbitant Charges"
Two cops, one city terrorized by overages and dead spots.

From the guy who brought you "Date Night" and "Night at the Museum: Battle for the Smithsonian" comes the one action-comedy you won't need to silence your cell phone for.

"Exorbitant Charges" stars both Luke Wilson (as AT&T spokesman Luke Wilson) and the Verizon "Can You Hear Me Now?" guy.

"Six Flags Over da Streets"
From the studio that brought you "Dangerous Minds" and "Freedom Writers" comes a tale of believing in yourself when the chips are down.

They were a street-wise group of inner-city teens. He was a mysterious, creepy old guy who taught them the power of dance. Together, their love for roller coasters, overpriced funnel cakes, and cheesy '90s dance music would change the world. This winter, more flags means more hugs.

The soundtrack is entirely made up of the Vengaboys' song "We Like to Party" (aka "The Six Flags Theme") as remixed by the Black Eyed Peas, Ke$ha, 3Oh!3, All-American Rejects and other terrible bands.

"Burger Satyricon"
Sex, violence and an ungodly amount of Whopper Jrs. all factor into this bizarre, Fellini-esque tale of the rise and fall of the Burger King "King."

How did he get to be the King? Why is he so irresistible to women? How can he appear in random places offering strangers a bacon, egg and cheese biscuit like it's no big thing?

This summer, audiences will find out why it's good to be the King -- if they can even figure out what's going on.

"Paranoia"
It's old-school thrills when the Geico money stack stars in the Hitchcockian thriller "Paranoia."

Who's watching you? A pile of cash with googly eyes. Bet you didn't see that coming!

Directed by whoever made "Saw VI."

"The Outlast"
The director of "The Road" returns to post-apocalyptic horror with this tale of a toy bunny that keeps "going and going and going" -- even after a nuclear holocaust turns the population into roving, cannibalistic gangs.

It's nearly three hours of the Energizer Bunny banging his drum through beautifully shot barren wastelands. Just give this one the Best Picture Oscar now, folks.

This Christmas, Energizer outlasts the competition ... until the end of time.