G spot
Getty
Anyone who has glanced at a Cosmo in a waiting room over the past 30 years likely saw an article about the "G spot," the elusive area in a woman's vagina that, if found, provides her with earth-shattering orgasms. Well, allegedly.

Since its inconspicuous discovery, physicians have been conflicted as to whether it exists. In an attempt to set the record straight, we've scoured the history books to present these highlights in G spot history along with our own completely unscientific measure of its perceived level of existence at the time. Finally, in the end, we hope to declare its existence fact or fiction once and for all.


1950: Father of the G Spot
Probability of G Spot Existence: 50 percent
Humboldt University, Berlin
When Ernst Grafenberg began studying women's sexuality in the 1930s, female orgasms seemed to be a cruel myth. In 1950, he published his seminal paper "The Role of Urethra in Female Orgasm," where he identified what he considered to be a patch of erectile tissue in the front of the vagina near the pubic bone. In the paper, he notes that when inserting a finger in the vagina to examine the urethra, women would positively respond if the finger touched this mysterious spot. Ah, science.
1960s: Only Thrusting Counts
Probability of G Spot Existence: 10 percent
YouTube
According to 1950s sitcoms, the era was a frigid time for marital relations. Yet William Masters, a gynecologist at Washington University, easily recruited couples to copulate in his lab. With his assistant (and later wife), Virginia Johnson, he observed couples engaging in every variation of il flagrante delicto. The pair was so keen to understand the mythical female orgasm that they designed a special camera they gave women to use while masturbating. After watching dozens of women using the camera, Masters and Johnson reported that only thrusting and clitoral stimulation caused orgasms for women.
1980s: A Spot Is (Re)Born
Probability of G Spot Existence: 75 percent
Macmillan USA
In the early 1980s, a psychologist, gynecologist and nurse examined 400 women and applied pressure in the vagina near the pubic bone -- Grafenberg's magical spot.

Their results were published in a book: "The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality," which indicated that if stimulated, the bean-shaped organ would provide women with the elusive vaginal orgasm. The researchers dubbed the area the "G spot" in honor of Grafenberg's research.

The warnings began immediately: "A lot of women are going to be upset if they can't find it," Midge Wilson, a social psychologist told Time in 1982.
2008: Italians Find the Love Muscle
Probability of G Spot Existence: 95 percent
MySpace
Leave it to the world's third-best lovers to use modern imaging techniques to find the G spot. In 2008, a team of Italian researchers used an ultrasound to develop pictures of the lady bits of 20 women. The paper in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that nine of the 20 reported experiencing vaginal orgasm, and it looked as if these women had thicker tissue around the G spot region.
2009: British Say the G Spot Doesn't Exist
Probability of G Spot Existence: 50 percent (G spot FAIL?)
Dvorak.org
In a study conducted in 2009, researchers from King's College in London reported there is no genetic basis for a G spot and that it exists as a figment of the imagination.

Yet about 50 percent of the respondents did say they had a G spot, and these women admitted to having better sex lives than those who didn't think they had a G spot.
2010: 'Ooh la la!' The French Strike Back
Probability of G Spot Existence: 80 percent
Wikimedia
Three weeks after the publication of the British study, the French held a meeting to discuss the problems with British lovemaking, er, research.

"I don't want to stigmatize at all, but I think the Protestant, liberal, Anglo-Saxon character means you are very pragmatic," Odile Buisson, a French gynecologist, told the Guardian.

Take that, boring British scientists. The French researchers said the results were erroneous because the British assumed that all G spots are alike. According to the French docs, G spots are as unique as snowflakes and that clinical, Anglo research cannot objectively find and understand the erogenous zones.